LivingMalibu.com » Selling My Home http://www.livingmalibu.com Malibu Real Estate-Malibu Homes For Sale Tue, 18 Jul 2017 20:51:46 +0000 en hourly 1 http://wordpress.org/?v=3.3.2 What Homeowners Can Do To Help Sell Their Home http://www.livingmalibu.com/what-homeowners-can-do-to-help-sell-their-home/ http://www.livingmalibu.com/what-homeowners-can-do-to-help-sell-their-home/#comments Wed, 06 Nov 2013 16:46:11 +0000 ritasimpson http://www.livingmalibu.com/?p=2920

An inviting open house can put your home on buyers’ short lists.

 

Four weeks before the open house Ask your parents to babysit the kids the weekend of the open house. Then book a reservation for your pet with the dog sitter or at the kennel. Having everyone out of the house on the day of will ...]]>

An inviting open house can put your home on buyers’ short lists.

 

Four weeks before the open house

  • Ask your parents to babysit the kids the weekend of the open house. Then book a reservation for your pet with the dog sitter or at the kennel. Having everyone out of the house on the day of will help you keep your home tidy and smelling fresh. Plus, no dogs and no kids equal more time for last-minute prep.
  • Line up a contractor to take care of maintence issues your REALTOR® has asked you to fix, like leaking faucets, sagging gutters, or dings in the walls.
  • De-clutter every room (even if you already de-cluttered once before). Don’t hide your stuff in the closet—buyers will open doors to size up closet space. Store your off-season clothes, sports equipment, and toys somewhere else.
  • Book carpet cleaners for a few days before the open house and a house cleaning service for the day before. Otherwise, make sure to leave time to do these things yourself a couple of days before.

Three weeks before the open house

  • Buy fluffy white towels to create a spa-like feel in the bathrooms.
  • Buy a front door mat to give a good first impression.
  • Designate a shoebox for each bathroom to stow away personal items the day of the open house.

Two weeks before the open house

  • Clean the light fixtures, ceiling fans, light switches, and around door knobs. A spic-and-span house makes buyers feel like they can move right in.
  • Power-wash the house, deck, sidewalk, and driveway.

One week before the open house

  • Make sure potential buyers can get up close and personal with your furnace, air-conditioning unit, and appliances. They’ll want to read any maintenance and manufacturer’s stickers to see how old everything is.
  • Clean the inside of appliances and de-clutter kitchen cabinets and drawers and the pantry. Buyers will open cabinet doors and drawers. If yours are stuffed to the gills, buyers will think your kitchen lacks enough storage space.
  • Put out the new door mat to break it in. It’ll look nice, but not too obviously new for the open house.

Week of the open house

  • Buy ready-made cookie dough and disposable aluminum cookie sheets so you don’t have to take time for clean up after baking (you can recycle the pans after use). Nothing says “home” like the smell of freshly baked cookies.
  • Buy a bag of apples or lemons to display in a pretty bowl.
  • Let your REALTOR® know if you’re running low on sales brochures explaining the features of your house.
  • Clean the windows to let in the most light possible.
  • Mow the lawn two days before the open house. Mowing the morning of the open house can peeve house hunters with allergies.

Day before the open house

  • Make sure your REALTOR® puts up plenty of open-house signs pointing in the right direction and located where drivers will see them. If she can’t get to it on the Friday before a Sunday open house, offer to do it yourself.
  • Put away yard clutter like hoses, toys, or pet water bowls.
  • Lay fresh logs in the fireplace.

Day of the open house

  • Put checkbooks, kids’ piggybanks, jewelry, prescription drugs, bank statements, and other valuables in the trunk of your car, at a neighbor’s house, or in your safe. It’s rare, but thefts do happen at open houses.
  • Set the dining room table for a special-occasion dinner. In the backyard, uncover the barbeque and set the patio table for a picnic to show buyers how elegantly and simply they can entertain once they move in.
  • Check any play equipment for spider webs or insect invasions. A kid screaming about spiders won’t endear buyers to your home.
  • Clean the fingerprints off the storm door. First impressions count.
  • Put up Post-It notes around the house to highlight great features like tilt-in windows or a recently updated appliance.
  • Remove shampoo, soap, toothbrushes, and other personal items from the bathtub, shower, and sinks in all the bathrooms. Store them in a shoebox under the sink. Removing personal items makes it easier for buyers to see themselves living in your house.
  • Stow away all kitchen countertop appliances.

One hour before the open house

  • Bake the ready-to-bake cookies you bought earlier this week. Put them on a nice platter for your open house guests to eat with a note that says: “Help yourself!”
  • Hang the new towels in the bathrooms.
  • Put your bowl of apples or lemons on the kitchen table or bar counter.
  • Pick up and put away any throw rugs, like the bath mats. They’re a trip hazard.

15 minutes before the open house

  • Open all the curtains and blinds and turn on the lights in the house. Buyers like bright homes.
  • Light fireplace logs (if it’s winter).
  • Didn’t get those cookies baked? Brew a pot of coffee to make the house smell inviting.

During the open house

Get out of the house and let your REALTOR® sell it! Potential buyers will be uncomfortable discussing your home if you’re loitering during the open house. Take advantage of your child- and pet-free hours by treating yourself to something you enjoy–a few extra hours at the gym, a trip to the bookstore, or a manicure.

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Pricing Your Home To Sell http://www.livingmalibu.com/pricing-your-home-to-sell/ http://www.livingmalibu.com/pricing-your-home-to-sell/#comments Fri, 28 Sep 2012 00:45:08 +0000 ritasimpson http://www.livingmalibu.com/?p=2384

A first-quarter survey of home buyers and sellers done by HomeGain.com, a real estate services website, revealed that 76 percent of homeowners believe their home is worth more than the list price recommended by their real estate agent.

Home buyers usually have a better grasp of current market value in the area where they’re looking to ...]]>

A first-quarter survey of home buyers and sellers done by HomeGain.com, a real estate services website, revealed that 76 percent of homeowners believe their home is worth more than the list price recommended by their real estate agent.

Home buyers usually have a better grasp of current market value in the area where they’re looking to buy than do sellers who own and live there. Buyers look at a lot of new listings. They make offers, know what sells quickly and for how much, and what doesn’t and why. HomeGain reported that home buyers still think sellers are overpricing their homes.

Your home is worth what a buyer will pay for it given current market conditions. This may not be the same as your opinion of what your home will sell for, or what you hope it’s worth. Relying on emotion rather than logic when selecting a list price can lead to disappointing results.

The prime opportunity for selling a home is when it’s new on the market. This is when it is most marketable. Buyers wait for the new listings. Usually, listings receive the most showings and have the busiest open houses during the first couple of weeks they are on the market.

This is the opportunity to show your house off to advantage with a list price that attracts buyers’ attention. Listings that sell today are priced right for the market. Buyers need to feel comfortable that they are getting a good deal.

Buyers won’t overpay if they feel home prices are still declining, and in some areas of the country, they still are. In areas of strong sales, buyers may shy away from multiple-offer situations if they feel the recovery is fragile and that prices may slide further before stabilizing. Even in areas where home sales have been strong in the first half of 2012, local practitioners wonder how long the uptick will last.

HOUSE HUNTING TIP: When selecting a list price, it helps to understand how real estate agents and appraisers establish an expected selling price or price range for your home. They research the recent listing inventory for homes similar to yours that sold. The most recent sales give the best indication of the direction of the market.

They analyze these comparable sales giving more value to your home for attributes that it has that the comparables don’t, like a remodeled kitchen. Value is subtracted from your home for features it lacks when compared with the sold comparables, like an easily accessible, level backyard.

It’s difficult for sellers to step back and take an attitude of detached interest in their home. But it’s essential to do so if you want to sell successfully in this market. For example, your home could actually sell for less, not more, than a comparable sale because you added a swimming pool in an area where most home buyers would rather have a yard with a generous lawn.

If the comparable sale information suggests that the value of homes like yours is declining, select a list price that undercuts the competition to drive buyers — and hopefully offers — to your home. You can take a more aggressive stance on pricing if the comparables show that prices are moving up.

If there is high demand for homes like yours, you may receive more than one offer. But don’t list too high. It’s better to stay in the range shown by the comparables and expose the house to the market before accepting offers. The market will drive the price up if it’s warranted.

THE CLOSING: Don’t rely on rumors circulating in the neighborhood about how high a home sold. Prices tend to get inflated when passed from one person to another. Select your list price based on hard facts.

Dian Hymer

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Three Consideration Before Listing Low To Get Offers http://www.livingmalibu.com/three-consideration-before-listing-low-to-get-offers/ http://www.livingmalibu.com/three-consideration-before-listing-low-to-get-offers/#comments Mon, 06 Aug 2012 13:13:23 +0000 ritasimpson http://www.livingmalibu.com/?p=2143

Q: What happens when you start out listing your home at a low price to entice buyers and the first offer is full price but no other offers come in? Are you stuck selling at the lower price (at which you never actually intended to sell)?

A: With multiple offers on the comeback, many savvy sellers ...]]>

Q: What happens when you start out listing your home at a low price to entice buyers and the first offer is full price but no other offers come in? Are you stuck selling at the lower price (at which you never actually intended to sell)?

A: With multiple offers on the comeback, many savvy sellers are pricing their homes on the low end with the intention to drive buyer interest and — fingers crossed — generate multiple offers. In markets where rising buyer activity and home values have already begun to decrease the inventory of available homes for sale, this strategy has been very effective. However, there is always the risk of precisely the problem you pose: What happens if you get only a single offer at the asking price?

Here are several pieces of advice for sellers who are worried about what happens when listing low doesn’t result in multiple offers:

1. Consider what the offer you get does and does not mean. You are never obligated to sell your home at a price you don’t want to, no matter how close the offer is to what you are asking for the property. I’ve actually seen a couple of situations in which sellers get a single full-price offer and reject it or issue a counteroffer, sometimes because they are in the situation you describe, and other times because it has come to their attention that they owe more on the home than they expected. (Don’t plan on doing this, though; it is a strategy with a high likelihood for disgusting a buyer and turning them all the way off.)

The reality is that, if you get only one offer at a given price, that may truly be the fair market value of your home even if you think you might have gotten a higher offer for the property had you asked for more. To live in that world of “what might have happened if” is to torture yourself with the impossibility of guessing at what a hypothetical situation would have turned out like. The real deal is that if you had asked for more, it’s possible you would have gotten more. It’s equally possible that the one buyer who did make an offer would never even have come to see the property.

2. Understand your listing agreement before you list it low. Under some listing agreements (your contract with the agent who lists your home for sale), a full-price, cash offer with no contingencies may obligate you to pay a commission even if “full price” is the discount price you set in an effort to get multiple offers. You can negotiate to change the default terms of your listing agreement, though, so that you are obligated to only pay a commission on a transaction that actually closes. You would need to do this before signing the agreement, and before the home goes on the market.

Get some legal advice from a local attorney if you don’t feel you completely understand the terms and implications of your listing agreement before you sign it and before you set the list price of your home.

3. Don’t list your home at a price you’d be upset to receive for it. The savvy sellers who list their homes on the low end to generate multiple offers are not listing their properties hundreds of thousands of dollars below their fair market value, or even making them the lowest-priced home in the neighborhood. Smart, aggressive pricing is listing a home at what seems like the low end of the range of comparable-supported prices or a slight discount from that — about a 2-5 percent discount, not 40 or 50, or 70 percent.

Many sellers are OK with taking the risk that their home might sell at 2 percent below the comparables as a trade-off for the opportunity to generate multiple offers and the possibility of receiving a premium sale price. And if you are a seller considering listing low, you should be aware of the potential trade-offs, and should make that decision only if you have market data to support the fact that this strategy makes sense in your local market.

To be crystal clear, as a seller, you should not list your home at a price you would be upset about receiving or unwilling to accept.

And remember that “listing it low” is a strategy that has proven to be successful for people specifically aiming to generate multiple offers in the many markets that currently support multiple offers. If your objective is simply to sell your home — period — in a down market, for example, then this may not be the route for you to take.

Every market is different, and every home and seller is different. If your market is still very soft or you don’t see any multiple offers happening in your town, you may not be able to generate loads of offers no matter what you price your home at. As always, work with your agent and take a long hard look at your local market dynamics before deciding on a pricing strategy.

Tara-Nicholle Nelson is an author and the Consumer Ambassador and Educator for real estate listings search site Trulia.com.

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What Sellers Must know About Contingency Free Offers http://www.livingmalibu.com/what-sellers-must-know-about-contingency-free-offers/ http://www.livingmalibu.com/what-sellers-must-know-about-contingency-free-offers/#comments Mon, 06 Aug 2012 13:08:47 +0000 ritasimpson http://www.livingmalibu.com/?p=2141

Contingency-free offers are popping up in hot market niches where buyers will take the risk in order to compete in a market with tight inventory and plenty of demand. What should a seller consider before accepting an offer with no loan contingency, no appraisal contingency, and no inspection contingency?

An all-cash offer with no financing contingency ...]]>

Contingency-free offers are popping up in hot market niches where buyers will take the risk in order to compete in a market with tight inventory and plenty of demand. What should a seller consider before accepting an offer with no loan contingency, no appraisal contingency, and no inspection contingency?

An all-cash offer with no financing contingency is a good deal only if the buyers actually have liquid funds to close. Make sure you verify this as a condition of accepting the offer.

The temptation is strong to sign the contract and worry about the details later. However, what you don’t want to have happen is a scenario like this: The buyers have their money in the stock market. The market drops and they end up with less cash than they need to close.

HOUSE HUNTING TIP: Savvy buyers who are in competition provide copies of bank statements, with account numbers blacked out, or a letter from a financial institution stating that the buyers have the liquid funds required to close, at the time they present their offer. If they don’t, make sure the contract requires that this documentation be provided within a couple of days of acceptance. If you have to put the house back on the market due to lack of funds, it’s better to do so sooner rather than later.

Sometimes buyers make all-cash offers but intend to get a mortgage to close the deal. This should be disclosed in the purchase contract even if the buyers don’t include a financing contingency to protect themselves in case their loan is not approved.

There is a big difference between buyers who have and will pay cash, and will close quickly, and those who say they’ll pay cash but need to go through formal lender approval before the transaction can close. Sellers who make plans based on the terms of the contract could find themselves in trouble if less-than-candid buyers can’t close on time, or at all.

A seller in this case may be able to pursue a legal remedy for financial remuneration, but this would require an attorney’s interpretation, and it would take time.

A similar problem can occur when buyers make an offer promising a large cash down payment, but change their mind at some point and decide to put less cash down, which requires a larger loan amount.

This can change the approval process significantly. The lender could require two appraisals rather than one if the loan amount is above a certain amount, like $1 million. The lender underwriting process is more rigorous. It will take more time and could delay closing.

A change to the financial terms of a home purchase contract, which is a bilateral contract, should be agreed to in writing by both buyer and seller. One party is not supposed to change the terms of a bilateral contract without the consent of the other party.

Offers with no inspection or appraisal contingencies, while appealing, can also be problematic. Unless the buyers have done preinspections, with the sellers’ permission, give a second thought to accepting an offer without an inspection contingency.

Even if you had presale inspections done, if something significant had been overlooked, you could end up in a legal battle later. To protect yourself, counter the offer to include a short inspection contingency so that the buyers can’t later say they bought the house under pressure and weren’t given the opportunity to inspect the property.

THE CLOSING: Sellers should make sure that buyers who make an offer without an appraisal contingency are willing and able to put more cash down, if necessary, to make the deal work if the appraised value turns out to be less than the offer price.

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Easy Tips To Improve Curb Appeal http://www.livingmalibu.com/easy-tips-to-improve-curb-appeal/ http://www.livingmalibu.com/easy-tips-to-improve-curb-appeal/#comments Tue, 05 Jun 2012 21:07:28 +0000 ritasimpson http://www.livingmalibu.com/?p=1728

No matter the asking price, simple curb appeal changes can set the scene to immediately attract buyers to a property. Data shows that a majority of home buyers look at properties online or drive by before contacting an agent. As a result, the exterior of the property is always a major selling point.

The decision to ...]]>

No matter the asking price, simple curb appeal changes can set the scene to immediately attract buyers to a property. Data shows that a majority of home buyers look at properties online or drive by before contacting an agent. As a result, the exterior of the property is always a major selling point.

The decision to buy starts when the prospects step out of their car in front of the property. Prospects will immediately imagine what their friends and family will think when they drive up.

Here are 10 easy steps to make the most of your curb appeal. (It is well worth the expense to hire someone to make these changes if you do not have the time!)

1. Make sure the lawn is mowed and the landscaping is pristine. Keep your gardens neat and healthy, and repair visible damage.

2. Clear the yard. Remove any visible trash cans, toys, tools, rusted outdoor furniture, old lumber, or yard debris.

3. Paint house trim and touch up concrete steps to freshen the look.

4. Paint the front door to give it a fresh look. Repair screens and screen doors.

5. Invest in a new and colorful welcome mat at the front door.

6. Add a potted plant to the side of the front door.

7. Replace the old brass doorknob and lock with brushed nickel.

8. Make sure the street numbers are polished, in place, and easy to see, even if this requires some major shrub or flower trimming. If your street numbers are painted on the curb, repaint them.

9. Replace that old, rusty mailbox in favor of a sleek, modern one. If your mailbox is attached to the house, replace it to match new hardware on the front door handle.

10. Wash all of your windows inside and out. The sparkle will show.

Curb appeal is extremely important when prospects are first beginning to make decisions about which properties they want to see with an agent. These simple changes will differentiate your property from others on the same street or nearby.

By Kimberly McMahon, Let’s Organize/Let’s Move

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Selling your Malibu Home? Tips here http://www.livingmalibu.com/selling-your-malibu-home-tips-here/ http://www.livingmalibu.com/selling-your-malibu-home-tips-here/#comments Tue, 08 May 2012 22:41:27 +0000 ritasimpson http://www.livingmalibu.com/?p=1591

Selling a home even in beautiful Malibu can be a daunting undertaking these days, and while you may be helpless to control the state of the market or the number of prospective buyers in your price range, here are a few ways to be proactive against some of sellers’ most common pitfalls:

Problem: Competition. Are there ...]]>

Selling a home even in beautiful Malibu can be a daunting undertaking these days, and while you may be helpless to control the state of the market or the number of prospective buyers in your price range, here are a few ways to be proactive against some of sellers’ most common pitfalls:

Problem: Competition. Are there too many homes for sale in Malibu in your price range? If there are too many options open to buyers in your market, you may not see as many showings as you’d like.

What You Can Do: Unfortunately, the state of the market in your neighborhood or town is pretty much beyond your control. You’ll need to think about how you can make your home a more attractive sale, either by lowering your price or providing attractive terms of sale.

Problem: Your asking price is too high. It’s stating the obvious, but if your asking price is too high, you’ll price yourself right out of a lot of potential showings. Further, even if you do manage to land a buyer at your price, his or her financing is more likely to fall through during the sale if the house will not appraise.

What You Can Do: Working with a trusted real estate agent to come up with a fair asking price is vitally important. Make sure you are educated about the market you’re selling in, and price your home accordingly. Ask yourself whether you’d rather net a little less than you had hoped – or not be able to sell at all.

Problem: Your home lacks curb appeal. The condition of your home inside and out is critically important to making a sale. If your home doesn’t show well, a potential buyer is going to head elsewhere. Most buyers are looking for a house they can move into without a ton of small repairs and cleanup.

What You Can Do: You’ve been meaning to fix that leaky faucet or repaint the fence in the front yard, so now is the time to do it! Of course, this should have been done when you decided to sell, but it’s never too late… De-clutter your rooms and store all personal effects. Consider investing in some new curtains, bath towels and throw rugs. To make sure that you nail that crucial curb appeal, spruce up your yard with new plantings, trim hedges and weed flowerbeds, and keep the lawn short and neat. Those minor repairs that you have been living with will add up in the eyes of a prospective buyer.

Problem: Location. Everyone’s heard that old maxim that real estate is all about “location, location, location!” But what do you do if you’re trying to sell a home on a busy street, or too close to a major highway?

What You Can Do: There are actually a few things you can do to increase your chances of a sale. If your home is on a busier street, highlight any benefits on the flip side—maybe your backyard is fenced in, your taxes are low or you can walk to a school nearby. Make sure you pay extra attention to those highlights. If you are in an area where your home is very close to a major highway, consider some type of privacy hedge or fencing. If you have older windows consider replacing them – the benefit will be two fold, you will have new windows as a selling feature and those new windows will provide a little more sound buffering inside the home. Last, consider selling at a time when the foliage is in full bloom to help naturally block sound or visual effects from nearby highways.

Problem: Your home is not easily accessible for showings. Are you getting a lot of showing requests that you are turning down? Many sellers make the mistake of not accommodating a buyer’s request for showings because requested showing times are an inconvenience to the seller.

What You Can Do: Try and remember that your home is a product for sale. Do whatever you can to cooperate with showing requests, even if they are last minute or on off hours. Make sure the house is always tidy while you are listed, so if you get a last minute showing you don’t have to run around spending hours cleaning. Do you have showing requests on a rainy Saturday? Take the kids to the museum. And if you get that 7pm showing request, take the family out for a bite to eat that night.

Problem: Your pet is an issue. Pet problems can go beyond the presence of an unfriendly pet barking or jumping on a potential buyer. Pet owners also need to go to extra lengths to make sure to remove pet hair, eliminate dander, and keep odor to a minimum.

What You Can Do: Yes, it’s extra effort, but you’ll reap the benefit of breaking out the lint brush, keeping the vacuum cleaner handy, and disinfecting areas where your pet has made a mess. Take your pets out of the house during showings or make sure they are crated. A potential buyer is there to view the home that is for sale, and should not have to worry what your pet is going to do.

Problem: Your agent is not aggressively marketing your property. Is your home listed in MLS and on public websites? Most buyers are shopping for a home online these days, so having an online presence is highly important. How well is your home being depicted in photographs and descriptions? Have you had enough open houses to showcase your home to the area brokers and to the public?

What You Can Do: First, consider the questions above and assess your answers. If you are dissatisfied with how your home is being marketed, you may need to sit down for a brainstorming session with your agent. Make your concerns and your wishes known.

Problem: Your agent is not familiar with your area. Did you list your home with an agent from outside of your area? Do they know much about your market, the comparables in your neighborhood and selling features of the community? Does your broker have to come from far away to simply show the house?

What You Can Do: Listing your home with a local Malibu agent is critical. If your agent knows little about the Malibu market, the comparables or the community how can they properly position your property for sale? They may be missing important selling features of your home, such as close proximity to a certain coveted school, or the selling price of a pending comparable. If they have to travel a long distance just to get to your property, over time they may lack motivation to show your home.

Do your research. Selling your home is a partnership between you and your real estate agent. Be an active participant. If you can contribute knowledge and strategy to the process of selling your house, you’re less likely to be tripped up by the common stumbling blocks that can prevent a sale.

 

 

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Will The Appraiser Count Un-Permitted SqFt on Your Malibu Home? http://www.livingmalibu.com/will-the-appraiser-count-un-permitted-sqft-on-your-malibu-home/ http://www.livingmalibu.com/will-the-appraiser-count-un-permitted-sqft-on-your-malibu-home/#comments Sat, 21 Apr 2012 23:46:08 +0000 ritasimpson http://www.livingmalibu.com/?p=1552

Whether an appraiser counts or does not include the un-Permitted SqFt in your Malibu Home depends.  Did you know that it varies by lender?  Don’t wait and guess.

 

Get  detailed information and insider answers before you list your Malibu home.

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Whether an appraiser counts or does not include the un-Permitted SqFt in your Malibu Home depends.  Did you know that it varies by lender?  Don’t wait and guess.

 

Get  detailed information and insider answers before you list your Malibu home.

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The Foreclosure Process In California http://www.livingmalibu.com/the-foreclosure-process-in-california/ http://www.livingmalibu.com/the-foreclosure-process-in-california/#comments Fri, 23 Mar 2012 23:44:15 +0000 ritasimpson http://www.livingmalibu.com/?p=1409

Be prepared and understand the process if you are interested in the Foreclosure market In California.

California Foreclosure is Non-Judicial. California Foreclosure Timeline Day 1-Day 90 Day 91-Day 110 Day 111 or more Redemption Period Publication Period Trustee’s Sale Lasts 90 days from the recordation of the Notice of Default Lasts 20 days from the end of Redemption Held 21 days after first publication

Read more

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Be prepared and understand the process if you are interested in the Foreclosure market In California.

California Foreclosure is Non-Judicial.

California Foreclosure Timeline

Day 1-Day 90 Day 91-Day 110 Day 111 or more
Redemption Period Publication Period Trustee’s Sale
Lasts 90 days from the recordation of the Notice of Default Lasts 20 days from the end of Redemption Held 21 days after first publication

Read more

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Odors Chase Away Buyers, Here Some Tips To Help http://www.livingmalibu.com/odors-chase-away-buyers-here-some-tips-to-help/ http://www.livingmalibu.com/odors-chase-away-buyers-here-some-tips-to-help/#comments Sun, 18 Mar 2012 18:26:08 +0000 ritasimpson http://www.livingmalibu.com/?p=1364

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Visit houselogic.com for more articles like this.

Copyright 2012 NATIONAL ASSOCIATION OF REALTORS®

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3 Hot Trends in Bathroom Remodeling http://www.livingmalibu.com/3-hot-trends-in-bathroom-remodeling/ http://www.livingmalibu.com/3-hot-trends-in-bathroom-remodeling/#comments Fri, 16 Mar 2012 23:41:52 +0000 ritasimpson http://www.livingmalibu.com/?p=1345

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Visit houselogic.com for more articles like this.

Copyright 2012 NATIONAL ASSOCIATION OF REALTORS®

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